The Hard Thing About Hard Feedback

When you’re a founder, you take a lot of feedback on different things. It doesn’t quite get annoying, that’s not the right word for it. So what is it like?

Sometimes it’s helpful because you see something new (rarely).

Sometimes it’s just another new data point.

Sometimes it’s frustrating because you know it’s something you should be doing but you’re not (often).

Talking to people is an essential part of your job. You can’t run away from them.

You’re talking to investors, employees, directors, customers, and everyone else. What are you going to do when people tell you your idea sucks?

How do you deal with that?

You don’t. You thank them for their feedback and you move on.

The hard part is knowing what to conclude from people’s feedback.

Some things to consider:

  • Listen
  • Assume people want to help you. The fact that they’re giving you advice means that they care about your success. So don’t take is an as attack.
  • Be aware of how it’s making you react. Are you getting upset? Are you getting frustrated? Are you getting excited? Those are all okay. But it’s worth being aware so that you don’t let those emotions blind you and make you do something or respond in a way that you shouldn’t.
  • One data point is not enough. You have to do additional research and talk to more people.

What is a 404 Page?

Okay, quick lesson. When you go to a link on the web, or visit a site on the web, you’re telling a server somewhere to send you a page. A server is basically the same thing as a site. For example, when you go to twitter.com you’re telling the Twitter server that you want to see their home page.

Every time you talk to a server, it’s called a request. The server then sends you back a page as a response. That whole system of communication is called HTTP (which is why the full URL is http://twitter.com). It’s like this:

  • You: I want the page at twitter.com
  • Twitter’s Server: OK! Got it for you.

or

  • You: I want the page at twitter.com/person-who-doesnt-exist
  • Twitter’s Server: Uhhhh, what? I don’t know who that is. Sorry there’s no page for you.

Each response is sent to you with a status code. Status codes are three numbers like 200, 404, 500, and 301. Normally you don’t see the status code, because it’s something your browser (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer *shudder*, or whatever) hides from you.

404 — means not found. Basically, you’re looking for a page but the web application you’re talking to has no idea what you’re talking about. This is almost always what happens when you try to load some random page that doesn’t exist, like www.google.com/sdflkjasdflwjks

What are some other important status codes?

There are literally dozens of status codes, but only a handful of really important ones:

200 — means OK, you got your page and everything’s good. Like when you visit www.google.com.

301 — means permanent redirect. This happens a lot without you realizing it. For example, when you go to facebook.com, you’re actually redirected to www.facebook.com, so your first request gets a 301 response telling your browser to www.facebook.com, which then gives your browser a 200 OK Status.

401 — means unauthorized. That happens when you try to load a page that exists, but you’re not allowed to. Like if it’s an admin page that you shouldn’t be able to access.

500 — means internal server error. Basically the application itself fucked up somehow. This is usually code error somewhere. They often look the same to you as a user, but there’s a major difference from the developers perspective.

There’s tons of others, but the basic rule is:

  • 1xx means informational (I’ve never actually seen this though, so don’t worry about what it means)
  • 2xx means success
  • 3xx means redirection
  • 4xx means a browser error — like you’re trying to load a page that doesn’t exist or you shouldn’t access. Basically it’s your fault usually.
  • 5xx means a server error — like the developer fucked up somehow.

Don’t worry, you’re not expected to memorize any of them. There’s a whole list of them all and what they mean on Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_HTTP_status_codes) in case you’re interested. Again, don’t try to memorize them. Did all of this make sense? Ok, good. Otherwise, post a question below.

P.S. Want to see some awesome 404 pages? Here are some of our favorites:

What is your favorite 404 page? Leave an image or link down below in the comment.

Entrepreneur.com Names One Month in 10 Startups to Watch at Social Media Week

Entrepreneur.com Names One Month in 10 Startups to Watch at Social Media Week

SMW 2015 New York CityThis week more than 70,000 people will come together to join in a global conversation at Social Media Week (SMW) a week-long conversation hosted across six continents, and connecting more than 1 million people around the globe.

As part of this conference, One Month will take the live stage in an event hosted by Entrepreneur.com as one of ten featured startups to watch on Tuesday, February 24th.

We’re stoked to be a part of the feature event, and event more excited for what Social Media Week represents. A global conversation around connected humanity, and what it means today to live, work, and play. We’re also teaching live master classes from their highline stages . We also have discount passes for people in our community who want to attend (see details below).

Social Media Week 2015: Upward Mobility and The Rise of The Connected Class

“We’re living in a time of unprecedented human connectivity. The world is changing and evolving at an extraordinary pace. Together we must work to gain deeper understanding of how we can achieve more in a future where more than 6 billion people on the planet will connect to each other.”

The connected class is “an emerging subset of our global society defined by those with access and connectivity,” as SMW explains, which today includes approximately 3 billion people in the world. This figure will change as our global citizens rapidly join the online conversation, with projections that 6 billion people will be online by 2022.

What does this mean for us, and for the future of connected humanity? How will technology impact the way that we live, work, and create? When 75 percent of the global population is interconnected, how will the world be (re)organized, disrupted, and shifted? Will business still function the same (probably not), and will our urban environments look the same?

With speakers from Martha Stewart to Pete Cashmore to the Revered Jesse Jackson, the event also includes jousting drones, roaming robots, and other surprises. Join us in person (or watch online)!

An Event to Globally Connect — Join the Online and Offline Conversations

The conversations are centered around the following themes, as described on the SMW website:

LIVE: “How will our ability to connect, share and exchange information with many more human beings positively impact our daily lives, our habits and our connection to humanity? Where will we look for trusted sources of information, and how will public opinion continue to shape those standards? How will data and personalization of information change the way we look at online identities and privacy?”

WORK: “What will the future of work look like and in what ways will we become more productive and efficient? What opportunities are available to entrepreneurs to build products and services for 6 billion connected citizens? How will the identities of brands continue to evolve and direct the consumer journey to find and connect with their products and services?”

CREATE: “How will ideas spread in an increasingly connected world, rapidly transforming ideas from small beginnings to epic scale? What will different cultures learn from each other? How will those lessons lead to new ideas, inventions and innovations? Will they empower us to achieve more? How will our ease in communications, no longer limited by time or distance, allow for improved collaboration?”

Join us at SMW — We’re Teaching Masterclasses and Taking the Main Stage!

If you’re a fan of One Month and you want to join us in person, we’ll be teaching Master Classes and attending the following events:

  • We’re being featured as one of ten startups to watch (Tuesday, February 24th 5pm-7pm).
  • Mattan is speaking on Wednesday the 25th at 12pm in a masterclass on Growth Hacking
  • Chris is speaking on Friday the 27th at a 1:30pm in a masterclass on PFNP
  • There’s also an opening party on Monday night!

One Month Friends and Community Discount Passes

We also get to invite you to join us with discount passes. If you’re in New York, or you want to watch the live streams online, take 20% off with either an Insider Pass or a Campus Pass discount, and we’ll see you there!