Coding Challenge: 3 Ways to Make Sure You Finish Every Course You Start

Listen, I’ll be the first to admit I can be incredibly lazy.

If you give me five minutes to finish a project, I’ll do it in exactly five minutes.

But if you give me five months to finish the same project, I’ll take the full five months!

I’m not alone in this. Most people are not self-starters for everything they do. But people do finish certain things. Most people finish high school. Most people finish college classes. But other things we don’t finish.

Why is that? These are things that can get challenging at times, and make you wanna go:

However… I believe I’ve identified the reason for most people finishing. It’s these three things:

Social Pressure
+
Financial Pressure
+
Super Clear Goals

If you have these three things in place, there’s an enormously large chance you will finish something.

For example, if you were enrolled in some college classes, here’s the breakdown of what keeps you going:

Social Pressure:

You are EXPECTED to finish the class because your parents, your professor, your friends all expect you to. It would be embarrassing and sort of shameful to not finish. So even when things get tough, you don’t just quit… you push through.

Financial Pressure:

Someone is paying for this! Maybe it’s your parents, maybe it’s you… but someone is shelling out money for you to learn, so you have to make sure you get your value out of it. People value things far more when they pay for them.

Super Clear Goals:

This one is a huge. By simply having an exact start date, check in times, and end date… you are far more likely to finish something.

In a college class the professor will tell you:

  • WHEN the first day of class is, and the exact time.
  • WHEN the quiz is.
  • WHEN the test is, and when it takes place.
  • WHEN the final exam is, and when it takes place.

These are all super clear goals you need to hit, or else suffer in some way.

However when people undertake something like One Month Rails, they make no specific end dates, forget to add in accountability, and maybe let it slide for a while. Meaning they don’t have all three elements for completion:

  • Social Pressure
  • Financial Pressure
  • Super Clear Goals

Without these three elements, most people won’t get things done! And if your goal is to learn rails, then you need to set yourself up for success.

So how does this help us learn from One Month?

Well, I originally started One Month Rails with no luck. I actually got to Video 2 then stopped because I had other stuff happening.

(In my real life I teach people how to become copywriters, which means I’m by no means a natural coder. It also means I’ve got TONS OF OTHER THINGS that constantly require my attention.)

You probably do too.

So when I get stuck on a video explaining how to upload to GitHub, or push to Heroku, and something goes wrong… I’d immediately give up!

So let’s apply these three factors for success and create our own Coding Challenge!

This is something fun you can do with your friends — here’s how you can create your own coding challenge!

1: Social Pressure

To create social pressure you need to involve some friends. This means you can go to Facebook and type it in real quick that you want to do a Coding Challenge, like this:

You can invite people from your school, family members, blog readers, whoever. I invited my friends and email list from my copywriting business. I got a total of 29 people who signed up.

Because of those 29 people, I now felt socially pressured to finish the course on time.

I also linked them to a Google Spreadsheet where they could enter their name and track daily progress like this:

So now there’s a tracking chart we can all use to publicly keep each other accountable.

The next step was communicating with each other, which was simply done through a free Slack chat group. It was pretty simple, and people could ask questions or publicly rouse each other if we were falling behind (people were cool with it).

2: FINANCIAL PRESSURE

The financial pressure comes from when people signup to One Month Rails. Of course you have to pay some money, so you now have skin in the game!

People grumble and moan about paying for stuff… but people value things far more when they pay for them.

One of the crazy things about this challenge was that I sent people who joined a referral link from One Month. You can signup for the referral program here: http://refer.onemonth.com

I actually made over $1,000 from the people I signed up! That was a bonus side-effect of the challenge ($1,082 to be precise):

I also charged people from my email list $100 to join the challenge. This resulted in more extra income (29 people X $100 = $2,900).

Making money was never an intent for this challenge, but it sure was a nice little bonus.

3: SUPER CLEAR GOALS

I looked at the One Month Rails schedule, and realized it was exactly 30 days.

So I set the date of the challenge as April 1st — April 30th. Exactly 30 days.

I decided that dedicating just one hour a day to learning Ruby On Rails would be doable. In fact it ended up being less than that, because some of the lessons can be completed in a few minutes.

So now everything was in place!

Social Pressure : Friends and others had joined the challenge. We had a tracking document. We had a chat group.

+

Financial Pressure : Everyone paid for One Month Rails.

+

Super Clear Goals: The starting date would be April 1st. The ending date would be April 30th.

And guess what… I ACTUALLY FINISHED IT ON APRIL 30th!!!

I had successfully built an app called NevTrest (like Pintrest) that actually worked! You can even upload Pins and Photos and Descriptions.

Even though it was pretty basic, I was immensely proud 🙂

And of course a lot of the people who did The Coding Challenge with me finished the course too. Check out one of the members emails to me after:

Hi Neville,

I got through the Coding Challenge last month. Thanks for putting it together. I’d been meaning to learn RoR for some time, but until the Challenge I kept putting it off. While I’m no expert yet, I feel like last month gave me a good foundation. Thanks again. — John Y.

Anyhow, I sincerely hope you take this advice to try and form your own Coding Challenge with your friends.

I sincerely think with the right mixture of Social Pressure, Financial Pressure, and Super Clear Goals you will set yourself up for success with One Month!

26 Ways To Attract And Grow Your First 1000 Subscribers

Here are a few ways to attract and grow your first 1,000 subscribers.

The hardest part of growing your product or business can often be the first part. How do you get your first few subscribers? How do you go from zero to one… to 10, 100, or one thousand?

Before I go any further, I have to reiterate what I say in my class and other places: the most important part of content marketing is creating content that is exceptional — valuable, useful, helpful, and share-worthy. If you don’t have great content, then the strategies below aren’t going to work.

At One Month, we ask ourselves, “would we share this?” This is part of our metric for whether or not a post is great. We don’t always get it right, but we’re learning as we go. We want to deliver extremely valuable, useful, intriguing, thoughtful content that helps you get more of what you want. If we wouldn’t share it with our friends, then you probably won’t share it with yours.

Once you have great content, however, how do you share it?

How do you get your first 1,000 subscribers? Here are some of the tactics and tools that have worked for us across many of our projects:

1. Tell your friends and colleagues about it.

You would be surprised how many people build something and then… expect people to show up. You have to invite them to come see what you’re doing. Send people personal emails or messages telling them exactly what you’ve built, why you think it’s useful for them, and what you’d like them to do with it.

You probably are connected to at least 100, if not 300 people that you can reach out to and let them know what you’re working on. Don’t spam everyone over and over again, but definitely tell them once about what you’re working on.

The trick? Ask people directly to sign up. Don’t expect them to sign up. Write a note to them that says, “I’m starting a newsletter about [TOPIC] and I think you might enjoy it. I’d love it if you signed up!”

2. Ask your friends and network to share it.

Email them and say, “I’m building this new thing, and I’d love to reach more people who would find this useful. Would you help me spread the word by reaching out to 5–10 people who might find this really helpful?”

Email and referrals are two of the best ways to grow signups. One email from a trusted resource to 5–10 people will generate far more signups than a random Facebook post that most of your network misses.

3. Comment helpfully on related blogs and other posts with similar questions.

Content marketing is about creating relevant conversations, not about shouting from the rooftops. Join the conversation by finding active voices and contributing wisdom and ideas to the community.

4. Become an active member in existing communities doing similar work.

Want people to comment on your blog post? Go comment on other people’s work!

5. Use paid advertising (Google, Facebook).

It’s fairly easy to set up a Facebook or a Google Ad, and for a few hundred bucks, you can drive signups. Make sure that you’re driving traffic to a page that has a big sign-up button. Don’t drive traffic to get more “likes” on your facebook fan page or to your website generally, however. Drive them exclusively to an offer (that they sign up with by email) or a place to sign up directly.

6. Make subscribing really easy to do.

It always surprises me when I go to a site and I have a ton of trouble finding out how to subscribe. Add a link in your website’s header, footer, sidebar, at the end of blog posts, in a feature bar, in the middle of blog posts, in the author bio, as a pop-up, as a hello-bar, etc. (You don’t have to do all of them, but do at least 4 different places and test which one is getting the most signups.) Add a page exclusively for signing up.

Start growing your audience today!

7. Add a link to your social profiles.

Add a link to your newsletter or mailing list across all of your social profiles: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Quora, Google+, Reddit, etc.

8. Add the site to the footer of your email, and invite people to sign up.

Use every single email you send as an opportunity to tell people about your projects.

9. Build a landing page exclusively for getting subscribers.

Dedicate a landing page exclusively for signups, like The Merchant Home does here:

10. Before you launch have only a landing page, dedicated to getting subscribers.

Put up a landing page before you launch.Create mystery and intrigue. Invite people to sign up before you’re ready. Use LaunchRock or another service to help you build this.

11. Force people to enter their email address before they get any content.

I don’t personally recommend this (in fact, I typically hate it), but it works for many people. I’d be remiss to not include it in this list. Use sparingly. People might hate you because of it.

12. Add urgency or a deadline.

Tell people what they’ll miss out on if they don’t sign up right now.

13. Host a webinar or a free event.

People love getting free stuff, and we love seeing what’s happening behind the scenes. Set up a free webinar to share what you’re working on (or your “10 best strategies for X”) and have people sign up with an email address to be notified when the webinar launches and when you do similar things in the future.

(Case in point: we’re hosting a free webinar on Growth Hacking on June 3rd, by the way. Join us!)

14. Make the offer really clear. What do they get for subscribing?

Make a compelling offer for what people get by signing up. “Great content” isn’t a compelling offer. What, exactly, are you going to give to them? Why should they spend their precious time with you, and let you into their inbox? Today’s inboxes are analogous to our living rooms. We don’t let just anyone come in. We invite people in that we want to have a conversation with. Why will they let you in?

“Your email inbox is like your living room. You don’t let just anyone in. It’s your online home, and you protect your space.”

15. Give away a free incentive for subscribing.

Make an offer that people can’t refuse. Some of our best signups come from our free offers — some of the experiments we’ve run here at One Month: we did a month of free writing prompts, offered recordings of our best webinars, and currently have a Growth Hacking Crash Course that people can sign up to for free.

16. Get really clear on who you want to connect with.

Why do you want to connect with them? What is their pain point? And why what you have to offer is different, better, and crazy-useful to the people who need it?

17. Add exit intent popups/offers.

Sumo is a great way to add a smart pop-up to your page, and PopUp Ally is also a great tool. An “exit intent” popup only shows up when the reader demonstrates an intent to leave your page (like moving their cursor to close the window or type in a new URL in the browser). You can “capture” people who are leaving with a bright, colorful exit-intent popup like this:

18. Get people to write for you.

Ask people to guest-post and publish with you. A great way to have people share your website is by asking them to contribute to it. Build your audience by utilizing other people’s existing audiences. They’ll share your site when they share links to their work that’s published on your site.

19. Syndicate your content.

Most of the content in the world, wide, web (that big old place) is only seen by a few thousand people, at most. Get your content shared by distributing it broadly. The same piece of content can be used in 10 different places — syndicated as a column, a blog, excerpts on LinkedIn, re-posts on Medium, etc. Content isn’t precious; you can share it in many, many locations.

Put a sign-up link in each of those locations!

20. Guest post, publish, and write for other people’s websites.

The best way to grow your audience is to play off of other people’s audiences that they’ve already built. Submit awesome content to sites that already have medium-to-big-audiences and watch your traffic grow.

21. Write a monthly column not on your own website, but a well-known website.

HuffPo, Forbes, and many other websites are often looking for monthly columnists and contributors. Build your web presence by writing for someone else — and capturing emails with a freebie on your own website.

22. Join social conversations.

Chime in helpfully in conversations and share your knowledge freely. Respond to and upvote other people’s work. This builds trust and reciprocity and people notice it when other people pay attention to them.

23. Use LinkedIn.

LinkedIn has often one of the best referral sources for our content and for business-related sharing. Use it to syndicate your content. Write blog posts on LinkedIn on a different publishing schedule from your regular content release schedule.

24. Go to conferences, online events, and join chats (like Twitter Hashtag chats) to meet more people in your target market.

25. Write an email newsletter.

Give people someething new to read every month, or a round-up of your favorite stuff on the web. You don’t have to write original content to have a compelling newsletter; if you link up the top 10 reads each month related to your subject area, that can be a great read. Email marketing is about connecting with people over email; it’s up to you to figure out what way you’ll use email to fit your businesses needs.

And this brings us back to where we started, which is worth repeating:

26. Write amazing content.

This goes without saying, but can be very hard to do. Give people a reason to read, use, and share your stuff. It’s worth the time — and it’s what builds your audience for the long-term.

Why a Growth Mindset is Essential for Learning

Have you ever heard anyone say “I can’t draw,” or “I’m not good at sports,” or “I could never do that?”

I used to think I’d never be able to draw. The way I understood the world was that there were artists, and then there were other people.

I was one of those other people. I had my own areas of creativity, but drawing wasn’t one of them. And yet somehow I stumbled into architecture and design school at the age of 21, trying to learn how to draw.

“Genius (or talent) is not enough; we need to get the job done.” — Carol Dweck

Even my graduate school teacher stood behind my desk and shook her head and told me that I wasn’t talented. (In retrospect, that wasn’t a very good example of teaching.) For years, I carried around a belief about my skill meant, in my mind, I’d never be able to do it.

Unfortunately, this is a mindset, and it’s one that we are all taught — but it’s incorrect. We can all learn, and part of this learning is about adopting a new mindset about how we learn at all.

How identifying and adapting your own mindset can help you learn

Interestingly, as children we’ll spend hours and hours learning how to do new things — from learning how to speak, crawl, walk, and go to the bathroom — but as adults, we think that our ability to learn is no longer part of our repertoire.

According to researcher Carol Dweck, the attitude and belief that you can’t learn something is part of a mindset, and it’s something that we can change. When it comes to our mindset, people fall into one of two predictable patterns: they learn to adopt either a growth mindset or a fixed mindset. The good news? These basic beliefs are learned, and we can changed them.

A lot of people seem to carry around fixed beliefs about what they can and cannot do.

Growth mindsets vs fixed mindsets

In a fixed mindset, you come to believe that your skills, traits, and talents are fixed. What you know is unchanging, and therefore, you can’t possibly learn anything new. While this seems extreme at first, you can hear it crop up in conversations when people say things like “I’m a terrible singer,” or “I can’t dance,” or “I’m not a good athlete.” All of these are an example of a fixed mindset.

The misfortune here is that people haven’t taken the time to practice — to work through and puzzle over something until they have acquired a new skill. And thus, they dismiss their ability and say that they simply “can’t” do something.

A growth mindset, however, believes that challenges and learning are opportunities, and that failure is an opportunity for growth. Rather than seeking out evidence that proves we’re not smart, people with a growth mindset focus on process and progress, searching out opportunities to stretch their existing abilities.

This belief that intelligence and personality can be developed has profound consequences on our behavior as adults. “Believing that your qualities are carved in stone (the fixed mindset) creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over.” People will avoid difficult situations, refuse to challenge themselves, and effectively evaluate every situation to see if it will make them look smart or dumb, whether they will success or fail.

In contrast, the growth mindset believes that “the hand you’re dealt is just the starting point for development,” and “that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts.” The growth mindset embodies a passion for learning (rather than a hunger for approval).

The growth mindset embodies a passion for learning rather than a hunger for approval.

Why prizing natural ability is bad for learning

When we prize “natural ability” or “talent” over learned ability, describes Dweck, we undermine the process of learning. When we expect ourselves to “just know it” and to be perfect from the first time we start anything, we end up creating a framework that scares us from trying anything new:

‘Mindsets frame the running account that’s taking place in people’s heads. They guide the whole interpretation process. The fixed mindset creates an internal monologue that is focused on judging: ‘This means I’m a loser.’ ‘This means I’m a better person than they are’ ‘This means I’m a bad husband.’ ‘This means my partner is selfish.’”

The reality, however, is that learning is a constant experience of expansion, difficulty, repetition, and mastery. When an toddler first learns to walk, we don’t yell at them for being incompetent with their first 100 or 1,000 tries. They fall down, they get back up. Nothing stops them for very long from eventually wobbling about on two legs.

Yet as we get older, we start to expect ourselves to naturally know how to do something. As a culture, we prize natural endowment over earned ability.

“As much as our culture talks about individual effort and self improvement, deep down, we revere the naturals.”

How many opportunities for learning are we losing if we place our admiration on youth and natural ability?

Growth mindsets prioritize learning:

People with a growth mindset learn that:

  • Trying and failing is part of the process
  • Learning requires stumbling, correcting, and growing
  • You don’t have to know everything in advance
  • Practice and skill-building are more important than embedded talent
  • You’re always a beginner
  • Life is about life-long learning

Three ways a growth mindset shows up in learning:

Once you know the difference between a growth mindset and a fixed mindset, you can start to notice how it shows up in your everyday habits and in your learning. Here are three ways that a growth mindset stands out:

#1: “Those with a growth mindset found success in doing their best, in learning, and improving.”

People with a growth mindset derive just as much happiness from the process as the results. They look for challenges and opportunities to engage with material, rather than deriving all of their satisfaction from mastery. Rather than focus exclusively on the outcome or the goal, they focus equally on the process.

Rather than desiring a finished book, written and perfected, they are motivated by the process of showing up every day to write and edit. Master athletic champions will continue to find ways to improve their personal best rather than sitting on the bench and buffing their nails.

#2: “Those with a growth mindset found setbacks motivating. They’re informative. They’re a wake-up call.”

“In the fixed mindset, setbacks label you,” explains Dweck. “You’re terrified of losing and performing badly, because to you, you are your performance. When you perform badly, you’re devastated, because you, by association, are now no longer valuable or special.”

Whereas a fixed mindset affixes their identity to the outcome, a growth mindset knows that their performance is not the only indicator of who they are. “Wow, that performance wasn’t as good,” the growth mindset might say. “I wonder what I could do differently to get a different outcome? How can I change and grow here to improve my game?”

#3 “People with the growth mindset in sports (as in pre-med chemistry) took charge of the processes that bring success — and that maintain it.

When you believe you are fixed, “you are not a work in process, you’re a finished product,” Dweck says. When you believe that you already have all of the ability you’ll ever have, there’s little reason to invest in processes that will help you grow your skills — that wouldn’t matter. “In the fixed mindset, you don’t take control of your abilities and your motivation.”

In contrast, the growth mindset knows that we are each responsible for our own learning and growth, and are therefore responsible for setting up systems for continuing our own learning. If we want to become a doctor, we’ll set out to learn everything about pre-med chemistry. If there are particular areas that are challenging or cause struggle, we’ll ask for extra help and spend more time on the puzzles until we figure out a way to do it.

Some of the best hip-hop dancers, for example, don’t just naturally begin with their talent. (And talent is a tricky word and often not a helpful word.) While talent might be what you begin with, where you end up depends on your desire to learn, practice, and improve. Many of my favorite performers have spent hundreds of thousands of hours practicing, falling, tripping, and stumbling over routines until they mastered their moves.

How to adopt the growth mindset in your own life:

  • Reward yourself for the process of working and learning, not the outcome…. such as working on challenging problems. Say to yourself “That was great — I really pushed myself and struggled with that for a while,” not “I’m such an idiot for not knowing this.”
  • When you successfully complete something, try out phrases that reward your ability to learn and grow, not your inherent success.
  • Search for and look for things that challenge you, and find ways to enjoy the challenge.
  • Don’t attribute your success or failure to inherent skills; instead, notice the hard work and effort involved in both.
  • Record the entire process (struggle and all) and begin to link the struggle with the adventure of learning.

Learn how to learn by training your own growth mindset:

Luckily, the growth mindset can be learned, says Dweck. People with the growth mindset are constantly trying to improve. “They surround themselves with the most able people they can find, they look squarely at their own mistakes and deficiencies, and they ask frankly what skills they and the company will need in the future.”

As for me, back in graduate school, I was surrounded by people who were drawing every day, and I had to complete drawing assignments every day for several semesters. Over time, the gap between my skill and my taste began to close, and my drawings improved, bit by bit. (For the first year and a half, I thought I wouldn’t actually be able to master the skills to further my design career.)

Then, about a year and a half in, I pinned a drawing up to the wall — a graphite still-life sketch. The teacher paused and said, “This one is not so bad — in fact, it has great linework in here, and we can work on the perspective over here…”

Today, a decade later, I still smile when people watch me draw and they tell me that I’m a natural. I think about the years it took for me to overcome my own beliefs and push my abilities, and how now I believe that anyone can learn anything. When people cough and say “I can’t draw,” I know for certain that yes, they too can learn to draw.

It might not be easy.

But everyone can learn.

What are littleBits?

What are littleBits?

LittleBits are kind of like legos, but for circuits. Using littleBits, you can make a wide array of hardware projects straight out of the box. Want to connect a timer to another device (like a flashlight, a tool, a musicbox, or even a couch)? You can!

You don’t need to know how to code to get started with littleBits — all of the logic is pre-programmed.

Here are some of the things you can make:

  • A flashlight
  • A flashlight with a dimmer
  • Or even a flashlight with a dimmer and an alarm clock!
  • As you can see, you can begin to build upon each item and make more and more complex projects.

Other projects you can try with littleBits:

Where to get started:

  • Visit littleBits.cc for more information and inspiration.
  • “The bits may be little, but the possibilities are epic!”