What Is FTP Upload?

What is FTP Upload?

File Transfer Protocol is one of the easiest ways to upload a website to the Internet. You probably know this, but every single website on the Internet is hosted on a server. Some of the content on the server, like the dynamic data of users, posts, or comments, may be generated live on the server, but many of the elements  such as the web design, headers, logos, and structure of the page are all uploaded to the server from someone’s computer. While most hosts (e.g. Hostgator, and Bluehost) offer some sort of file manager, it’s often fairly limited. File Transfer Protocol, or FTP for short, allows you to upload, download and manage your website’s files. In this beginner FTP tutorial I’m going to show you get started transfering files.  

What is FTP?

FTP is a protocol that was first created in 1971. At that time, most file transfer actions were accomplished through manual command-line inputs. Savvy developers decided that it would be much easier to automate the various applications of FTP and collect them together into a program with a graphical user interface called an FTP client.

1. Set Up a Host 

Before you can upload anything to your website, you’ll need it hosted somewhere. This is a great article on how to get started with HostGator if you aren’t already.

After you set up your hosting, you’ll receive a “Welcome” email that has login credentials. Make sure to archive this email, because you’ll need those credentials later.

2. Download your first FTP Client: Cyberduck

There are lots of popular options out there, but if you’re using Windows or Mac, we recommend Cyberduck. It has a long list of features including bookmarks, local-remote synchronization and encryption. Basically, whatever you need to do in terms of file transfer, Cyberduck can get it done. Did I mention that it’s open-source and free?.

It’s also easy to install. Just visit cyberduck.io and click the appropriate download link for your system.

How to setup FTP, SFTP and Amazon S3 using Cyberduck

How to setup FTP, SFTP and Amazon S3 using Cyberduck

3. Connect to Hostgator

In order to use FTP you’ll need to have a host.

http://www.pfnp.me/how-to-setup-hosting-with-hostgator/

Connecting to HostGator with Cyberduck is easy:

  1. Click the “Open Connection” button at the top-left of the Cyberduck window.
  2. Next to “Server:” enter the domain or IP address for your server and make sure the port is set to 21.
  3. Use your cPanel login credentials for the username and password.
  4. Click “connect” and you’re in! If you see yourself managing files on your server frequently, you can save the connection as a bookmark (Bookmarks > New Bookmark).

How to setup FTP with Cyberduck – username and password

4. Upload and Download Files

Once you’re logged in, you’ll see a list of all the files in the home directory for your user. You can browse through them the same way you do the filesystem on your own computer. Click on the small arrows next to folders in order to expand and contract them. Right-click on any folder or file for a list of actions you can perform on the file (or in the folder you clicked in)

How do I upload files?

Uploading files is easy, just right-click, select “Upload” and browse your local filesystem for the file or folder you need to move to the server. Downloading works much the same. Take note that the default “Download” action automatically pulls files down to your default download folder. If you want to rename or choose the location of the download, select “Download As”.

What is synchronize?

A powerful feature you should be aware of is the “Synchronize” action. Suppose you have a local copy of your website and that you’ve edited a handful of files within different folders of your website. Instead of individually uploading each updated file, you can simply right-click the top-level folder for your site and synchronize it with your local copy. Everything you changed will be updated. In the process, you can un-check any files that you don’t want updated.

5. Cyberduck Special: Modifying Files

One of the most powerful features that Cyberduck offers is the ability to edit remote files with your choice of software on your local system. Technically you aren’t editing the file while it’s on the server, as Cyberduck downloads the file, opens it with your preferred editor, then uploads the file when you save it. However, this all happens automatically. The effect is such that you can modify your website almost as conveniently as if it were on your local system.

One Last Question: What is SFTP?

You might notice the option in CyberDuck to connect with SFTP. This is just FTP but encrypted, i.e. “secure”. If your hosting plan offers SFTP, there’s no reason not to use it.

Conclusion

FTP with Cyberduck is an efficient, easy and powerful way to manage the files on your server. Once you’ve set-up your connection, organizing, renaming and editing your files is almost exactly like doing so in your local file browser, but with “Upload”, “Download”, and “Synchronize” actions to manage files between two systems. Once you’ve made the switch, you’ll probably never use a browser-based file manager again!

WordPress vs. Squarespace

WordPress vs. Squarespace are both reasonably priced options for building beautiful websites. If you’re a photographer, business owner, student, blogger or looking to build your personal portfolio then both WordPress and Squarespace are wonderful. How are WordPress vs. Squarespace different from each other? Which is better?  In this article we will examine the differences — with examples —  of the pros and cons of both WordPress and Squarespace.

What are the benefits of WordPress?

WordPress has been around since 2003. You may know it as a blogging platform, but what else can it do? WordPress is a type of Content Management System ( aka CMS). What’s a CMS? Every website on the Internet needs a place to store and organize content — that’s what a CMS does. When you first login to WordPress the Dashboard you’ll see the WordPress Dashboard, this is where you create new posts, upload photos, edit pages, tags, categories, and monitor your comments, etc.

WordPress Admin Preview

WordPress Stats Preview

WordPress powers 29% of the Internet. That means that 1 in 4 Website, of all the Websites in the world, are WordPress Websites.

There are two types of WordPress sites you can create:

What are the benefits of Squarespace?

Squarespace is a publishing platform for the non-techie. Squarespace is also used by photographers, entrepreneurs, and bloggers. With Squarespace you can easily create a portfolio website, an e-commerce store, or even run your small business. Their claim to fame is their dead simple WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) drag and drop editor that allows you to create your site with fluidity and ease.

With Squarespace, you are required to host directly through Squarespace, while WordPress allows you to host your website on any hosting service (which allows for more customization).

Ease of Use Creating New Content

WordPress is a dead simple platform to use, albeit a powerful one. This is why it continues to be a very popular option for creating and growing websites. To get started all you need to do is simply download the WordPress open source code, host it on a server, choose a theme, and you’re up and running.

Squarespace’s WYSIWYG editor can have your site up and running in minutes. They offer beautiful designs and their simplicity allows for people with non-technical backgrounds to build websites with ease. Due to the “live” nature of the building stages, you can instantly see how your site will operate, which is perfect for the ADD generation.

Look and Feel: WordPress Themes vs. Squarespace Templates

With WordPress you have a plethora of choices available when it comes to themes. Themes are basically how your site looks, feels, and operates. Without knowing how to hard code with HTML and CSS, you just click “apply” and you’re good to go.

WordPress theme examples:

WordPress Theme

WordPress Theme: Shapely

WordPress Theme

WordPress Theme: MedZone

WordPress Theme Example

WordPress Theme: Sentio

Squarespace on the other hand uses something called Templates. For all intents and purposes, they are more or less the same as WordPress’ themes. The aesthetic is perhaps a bit more “modern”.

Squarespace template examples:

WordPress Theme: Cacao

Squarespace template: Forte

Squarespace template: Om

Adding theme extensions: WordPress Plugins vs. Squarespace Content Blocks

Plugins are pieces of software you can install to add or enhance functionality on your WordPress site. There are thousands of free plugins to choose from in the directory. There is the option for paid plugins that provide customer support if need be. Plugins can be great additions and enhancements to your website as the library continues to grow.

Free WordPress Plugin Examples

Free WordPress plugin examples

Squarespace calls their extensions Content Blocks. With these “blocks” you can add information such as text, video, forms, and images. They are fairly similar to plugins, yet are perhaps a bit more intuitive in nature. They too create a more dynamic feel to your domain.

Pricing: Hosting

When considering to go the WordPress or Squarespace route, you’re going to need a place to park your domain. With WordPress, your site will need to be hosted on a server. There are plenty of Web Hosting platforms to choose from such as Bluehost or HostGator. Many of these Web Hosting services provide similar experiences. The good thing is that they’re all fast, reliable, and inexpensive.

With Squarespace on the other hand, hosting is automatically included. In a nutshell, you are the guest and they are the host! If your domain(s) are hosted elsewhere, you have the option to transfer them to Squarespace if you so choose.

Support: The Support Team

Contact SquareSpace Support

Official support articles are provided for WordPress. Other than that you are going to have to rely on searches, blogs, forums, YouTube, and the like. They however do not offer human to human engagement.

 

Much like WordPress, Squarespace has support articles and answers to frequently asked questions. What differentiates it from WordPress is the 24/7 team.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Conclusion 

WordPress is the way to go. If you want a more robust platform that offers a “beefier” dashboard then WordPress is your option.

These two platforms offer excellent means to getting a site up and running. Depending on your wants and needs, each can provide something a little different. Both WordPress and Squarespace offer simple solutions for you Web needs. Like anything else, it is a matter or preference.

If you would like to dive deep into WordPress, One Month now offers the course, One Month WordPress. Chris, the teacher for the course, has been using WordPress for 10 years and will surely get you moving in the right direction. He’s created WordPress themes for The Black Eyed Peas, General Assembly, Toyota, Aldo, Agency Sacks, and New York Green Roofs. We hope to see you there!

25 Essential Books on Storytelling, Copywriting, and Marketing to Read

25 storytelling books

How do you teach yourself about storytelling? Why is it that some copywriters seem to nail it, while others flounder?

These were the questions I asked myself when I started first started my CAD drafting job in architecture. Fresh out of graduate school, far too many dollars in debt, and stuck behind the drafting table, I listened as clients and ideas moved in and out of the office.

I started to notice the same patterns happening over and over again. Saw brilliant designers and creative urban planners come up with strategies for re-designing cities. Saw tools to change the ways buildings breathed and moved, how people interacted. I saw those ideas crushed, time and time again, under a lack of understanding.

The same things kept happening: during the presentation, ideas weren’t communicated in a way that resonated.

The same things kept happening. During the presentation with the client, the city, or the public agency, the ideas weren’t communicated in a way that resonated — and persuaded. Some people would get caught up in tiny details; others would miss the big picture. Sometimes a great idea got buried under the weight of myopic details.

In addition, your audience has different styles of decision-making. Some leaders make decisions immediately, swept up in ideas and willing to go along. Other leaders need to ruminate and process. Some folks want to believe that they’ve been the ones to come up with the idea.

The art of persuasion and conversation is its own art, its own field.

Knowing how to explain your idea in a way that is compelling, clear, and persuades others to adopt it (and give you money for it!) is no easy task. Tired designers kept arriving at brilliant solutions. They also faced the challenge of explaining themselves. Communication is the art of getting your ideas heard, shared, understood, and adopted. Designing and communicating are separate, but highly related fields.

I began to research communication, persuasion, and storytelling.

Over the past eight years, I’ve read more than 100 books on storytelling, persuasion, copywriting, content marketing, and designing presentations. From Edward Tufte’s books on information design to Joseph Campbell’s The Hero’s Journey, to the neuroscience behind storytelling. This year, I’ve compiled the top 26 books that I think every leader, communicator, thought leader and business owner should read.

This year, if you want to get better at communicating your visions, positioning yourself as a thought leader, and sharing your work in the world, you’ll need to elevate your storytelling, copywriting, and persuasion skills.

“If I ask you to think about something, you can decide not to. But if I make you feel something? Now I have your attention.” — Lisa Cron

If you want to up your game and grow your business, elevate your platform, or become a better storyteller — read these books. 

BOOKS ON PERSUASION + COMMUNICATION: 

1: Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, by Robert Cialdini. Influence is a science — it’s not magic; and Cialdini outlines six principles for how people relate to each other, socially, and why tools like reciprocity, scarcity, and liking affect how we interact with each other. It’s also delightfully fun to read.

2: The Elements of Persuasion: Use Storytelling to Pitch Better, Sell Faster, and Win More Business. Stories might seem simple, but understanding how to do them effectively is a skill to master. Maxwell and Dickman show examples of storytelling across every industry, outlining five basic components — passion, a hero, an antagonist, a moment of awareness, and transformation — that form the critical elements of a persuasive story, pitch, or speech.

3: HBR On Communication, by Harvard Business Review.  I haven’t picked up an HBR series book I haven’t liked — dense, packed with the latest research, yet distilled into essential tips, Harvard Business Review’s “10 Must Reads” lives up to its name. With essays on persuasion, influence, and understanding conversational style, I learned more about understanding gender dynamics and understanding leadership styles in 40 pages than I have browsing hundreds of internet click-bait links.

4: Trust Agents, by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith. Destined to be a classic. How do people become online influencers? They do more than provide content: they establish valuable relationships, reputations, and utilize media to build trust relationships as leaders and agents in an increasingly interconnected, complex world.

5: How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie. “You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.” ― Dale Carnegie.

“Often we don’t realize that our attitude toward something has been influenced by the number of times we have been exposed to it in the past.” ― Robert B. Cialdini

BOOKS ON WRITING:

As a writer, my favorite books on writing lean towards the introspective, the habit-building, and the people who devote time to this craft. Here are my favorites:

6: The Artist’s Way, by Julia Cameron. Want to tap into your inner voice? Julia Cameron leads a 12-week program that takes you through all the feelings you have while becoming a maker, a creative, an artist. Yes, you’ll get frustrated. You’ll get mad and stuff from your childhood will surface up. Cameron is here to guide you — and to remind you to play, because play is the outlet and source of creativity. Her “Artist Dates” remind me that exploring the world and documenting my thoughts is exactly what I should be taking time to do.

7: The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles, by Steven Pressfield. What holds us back? Ourselves, of course. This pithy and succinct book details the enemy that we all deal with — inner resistance. Resistance shows up in every form, from convincing to conniving to flattering to maddening. How do you overcome Resistance? Simple: show up and work, bit by bit, day by day. Great on a shelf for a little reminder every few days.

“If you find yourself asking yourself “Am I really a writer? Am I really an artist?”, chances are you are.” ― Steven Pressfield

8: Zen in the Art of Writing, by Ray Bradbury. Here are three quotes from this book by legendary Ray Bradbury: “You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.” ― “Every morning I jump out of bed and step on a landmine. The landmine is me. After the explosion, I spend the rest of the day putting the pieces together.” — “Plot is no more than footprints left in the snow after your characters have run by on their way to incredible destinations.”

“You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.” — Ray Bradbury

9: Bird by Bird, by Anne Lamott. A book on writing and life, and all the zany-crazy-personality quirks in between. Fluttering between self-deprecation and frank honesty, Lamott tells the story of the difficulty of writing and getting out of our own way. Humorous at times and painful at others, I have owned this book for more than 10 years and refer to it readily whenever I experience my own writers’ block.

10: Still Writing, by Dani Shapiro. Practical, wise, clever, and funny, Shapiro takes her 20-odd years as a writer and a teacher and tells the story of what it’s like to write. Each chapter is a new essay, a piece of advice, a glimmer into what she’s done. Wise and brilliant.

11: On Writing, by Stephen King. Writers writing about writing is so wonderful — you see their tools, ideas, and childhood and work, all mixed together in a story well told. Stephen King doesn’t disappoint.

12: Show Your Work, by Austin Kleon. This book is about making things, just making them — and about sharing them. It’s time that you promoted yourself in a way that’s authentic and normal to you, and that’s related more to you sharing the work that you’re making (however discomfortable) than it does being a master promoter.

“But now I realize that the only way to find your voice is to use it. It’s hardwired, built into you. Talk about the things you love. Your voice will follow.” — Austin Kleon

STORYTELLING:

13: Resonate, by Nancy Duarte. This book is a foundation for designing visual presentations that have emotional clarity and pull. She diagrams (beautifully!) the Hero’s Journey and the structure of moving speeches, from Martin Luther King, Jr. to Bill Clinton. I’ve read and re-read this book dozens of times and keep a copy at my desk for close reference.

14: Winning the Story Wars, by Jonah Sachs. A lot of books on storytelling are stuffy and academic; this is not. Sachs shows how mass media and brands are failing to tell great stories, and why it’s now a race for businesses to reconnect with the vital ingredients of storytelling — or risk being left in the dust. This book is a clear look at how marketing, business, and storytelling are all tied together.

15: Joseph Campbell: The Hero’s Journey. A seminal work on storytelling, Campbell created the Hero’s Journey, which dissects the structure of great mythologies across religions, contexts, and time. Each Hero has a call to action and proceeds around the mythological clock (or circle) through a number of steps on an adventure from the known world to the unknown world.

16: Wired for Story, by Lisa Cron. “The Writer’s Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence”—Lisa Cron maps out how storytelling works and why we’re wired to listen closely, from hook to structure to finale. Stories ignite our brains in predictable patterns, and knowing the science behind why storytelling works will change your writing faster than any other writing advice might.

17: Improving Your Storytelling, by Doug Lipman. This book looks at the oral history of storytelling and places stories in the context within which they were born. I learned exercises of imagination, detail, and adding environmental cues from this book — and even dabbled in understanding the stand-up, performative aspects of storytelling (whereas most of the other books in this list are focused on narrative and written stories).

18: The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human, by Jonathan Gottschall.  Humans spend as much as four hours a day in lands of make-believe (if not more). We make up fantasies, read novels, enjoy plays, and live in dream-lands most of the time. Gottschall combines neuroscience, psychology, and storytelling to explain what it means to be a human animal. At it’s core it is what stories have to do with instincts, decision making, survival, and behavior change.

19: A Million Miles in A Thousand Years, by Donald Miller. How do you live a successful story? How does a life become more than a set of random experiences, many of which you don’t seem to have any control over? Donald Miller sets out to write a book about stories, and realizes that his life isn’t very interesting — and doesn’t follow the narrative structure of a story. In this tale, he decides to make his life worth telling, and reveals how story structure works, one lesson at a time.

“And once you live a good story, you get a taste for a kind of meaning in life, and you can’t go back to being normal; you can’t go back to meaningless scenes stitched together by the forgettable thread of wasted time.”
― Donald Miller

MARKETING + UNDERSTANDING MEDIA:

20: Tested Advertising Methods, by John Caples. A primer on all things copywriting and advertising. Originally published in 1978, this book is still a standout example of how to write great copy, headlines, and advertisements. He breaks down the components of advertisements and why some ads sell three times as much as other ads. This is one of the most useful books on advertising. If you’re a copywriter, content marketer, or sales person — you’re in the business of writing headlines every day.

21: Breakthrough Advertising, by Eugene M. Schwartz.Did you know that there’s an urban legend about an elusive book known for it’s legendary advertising copy? Apparently it’s considered a special gift bestowed upon newbie marketers and copywriters. It’s in such demand that this book retails for $300 or more with used copies. Sometimes it can even be found for over $900 on Amazon! Called one of the best books in advertising and recommended by most of the top internet marketers out there today. It digs into the art and mastery of great copywriting. It’s not formulaic — it’s an evolving art, and one that you have to pay attention to and constantly adapt in order to do well.

22: Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator, by Ryan Holiday. Blogs, tweets, and social media distort the news like never before. A single malicious rumor can cost a company millions. Products, celebrities, attention? It’s all a game. Ryan Holiday, Marketing Director for American Apparel, takes you behind the spin cycle of creating news. He shows how he consistently and deliberately changed the news cycle and created stories in his favor. Eye-opening and sometimes disgusting, it’s best to know what you’re getting into in today’s media landscape.

23: New Rules for A New Economy: Kevin Kelly. Kevin Kelly, editor of Wired, wrote this book in 1999 — and I still pick it up and re-read it. Offering wisdom about the changing connected world, Kelly suggests that communication is what drives change. Today, connectivity is everything, and “success flows primarily from understanding networks, and networks have their own rules.” He details ten principles of the connected economy and how they play out in business, economics, and life.

24: Positioning: The Battle For Your Mind, by Al Ries and Jack Trout. Trout is considered the father of advertising and a guru of branding, marketing and product management. He brings together elements of psychology and user experience to show how to describe things to the people that matter to your business–your customers. It’s not how you understand what you do; it’s how well you explain it to others, in a way that stands out.

25: Oglivy on Advertising. One of the premier advertising and sales books of all times. Oglivy is a genius. “Ogilvy’s writing is captivating. His work, legendary. His ideas, timeless.” I’ve only begun to dig into the genius in this book, and fully expect to have it dog-eared, flagged, marked, highlighted, and re-read multiple times over.

“Where people aren’t having any fun, they seldom produce good work.” ― David Ogilvy

BONUS — FAVORITE FICTION + NARRATIVE NON-FICTION BOOKS:

I think all great writers need to be great readers. If you’re feeling stuck on technical books, then toss the technical books to the side and pick up a great fiction book. The point of a story is to become absorbed in it. We can pick up great habits by reading good works. (Although a few of the books above, like A Million Miles, Bird by Bird, Still Writing, and On Writing read like narratives).

Some of my recent favorites in fiction and narrative non-fiction are:

  • Americanah
  • Behind the Beautiful Forevers
  • Bend, Not Break
  • Brave New World
  • The Cuckoo’s Calling
  • Ender’s Game
  • The Fault in Our Stars
  • Fahrenheit 451
  • The Fear Project
  • The Glass Castle
  • The Kite Runner
  • Life of Pi
  • The Longest Way Home
  • The Signature of All Things
  • What I Talk About When I Talk About Running
  • The Year Without Pants

Bluehost vs. HostGator – Which is The Best Web Hosting in 2018?

 

Bluehost vs HostGator

Bluehost and HostGator have been around since the early 2000s and are both great choices for Web Hosting. Each offers a cloud plan that boasts a good mix of reliability, scalability, and performance at very reasonable prices. How do they stack up against each other?

HostGator Cloud Plans

Screengrab of Bluehost Cloud Plans

 

Bluehost vs. Hostgator: Basic Cloud Plans

Host BlueHost Hostgator
Plan Prime Baby Cloud
Number of websites Unlimited Unlimited
Storage Space Unmetered Unmetered
Bandwidth Unmetered Unmetered
Domain name included? Yes Yes
RAM 4 GB 4 GB
Available CPUs 4 4
Local Caching Yes Yes
Introductory Price $8.95/mo. $7.95/mo.
Renewal Price $13.99/mo. $11.95/mo.

How does “unmetered” differ from “unlimited”? Unmetered means that you won’t be charged according to your usage, as long as it remains within reasonable limits. For example, if you want to download and host every Will Ferrell movie ever made you’re likely going to be asked to scale back your usage. Otherwise, you probably don’t need to worry about it.

The features offered by the introductory plans are almost identical (see chart above), save for the price. It’s important to note that introductory prices apply only if you pay up-front for a 3-year plan. HostGator has a slight edge here, but not by much. Before you make a 3-year commitment, consider the following important hosting metrics.

Bluehost vs. Hostgator: Reliability

If you’re paying for a professional hosting service you probably expect your site to always be available. Hence, uptime is an important measure of a host, even though it isn’t often included in the usual list of “what you get for the price”.

Fortunately, hostingfacts.com has been monitoring test websites for Bluehost and HostGator since 2016. For the months measured Bluehost showed an average of 99.96% uptime, while HostGator averaged 99.96%. That’s not much of a difference, so let’s look atthe worst month measured for each service. Bluehost’s worst measured uptime was 99.81%, while HostGator’s was 99.87%. Again, HostGator has a slight edge, but this time it’s practically negligible. The high level of uptime is accomplished by mirroring your data across three devices and implementing a strict failover protocol. For example, if one of the three devices goes down, your data is immediately copied from one of the remaining two to a fourth device.

On top of this service redundancy, both hosts offer an option to create a daily backup of the code that powers your site. For example, if you’re experimenting with a new feature and it breaks your whole site, you won’t have to worry about rebuilding anything. Just a few clicks, and you’ll be able to restore your site to the way it was yesterday. This option is an extra $2.99/mo at Bluehost and $2.00/mo at HostGator.

Bluehost vs. Hostgator: Performance

“Ping speed” is the time it takes a server to receive and respond to the most basic request, which makes it an ideal standard with which to compare services. Thankfully, hostingfacts.com also measured average monthly ping speed:

Ping Speed Overall Average Worst Monthly Average Best Monthly Average
Bluehost 487 ms 705 ms 277 ms
HostGator 470 ms 728 ms 252 ms

HostGator has an edge here, but it’s even more miniscule than the difference in uptime. The chart above shows a difference of about 21 ms. For reference, the average duration of a single blink of a human eye is around 250 ms. Both hosts have lightning fast speeds, even in their worst months.  

Bluehost vs. Hostgator: Ease of Use

On both Bluehost and HostGator, you’ll use cPanel to manage your servers. “cPanel” stands for Control Panel, and is exactly whatyou would expect. At a glance, you can monitor your disk space, memory, and CPU usage, as well as bandwidth transfer for the month. Managing file uploads and applications on your server is all accomplished through a graphical interface that will be familiar to anyone who has spent time with a computer in the last decade (i.e. basically everyone).

You can get a WordPress site up and running in no time with an easy one-click install. If you’re unfamiliar with WordPress, both hosts also offer a drag-and-drop solution. The free version of Weebly is included with all Bluehost and HostGator cloud packages. It’s worth noting however, that if you need extra features, like SSL or payment portals, you’ll end up paying a little bit more, depending on your package and the applications involved.

Bluehost vs. Hostgator: Support

Bluehost and HostGator both advertise robust technical support: you can either call or chat online 24/7. However, user reviews of customer support are mixed, ranging from “no problem, perfect service” to “waited two hours and they couldn’t help me”. Unfortunately, the negative reviews seem a little more common than the positive ones. This is the only real issue with Bluehost or HostGator. Frankly, at the low price point offered, spotty support shouldn’t be too much of a surprise.

Our advice: stay on the safe side and do some research on whatever it is you want to build before you sign up with either service.

Bluehost vs. Hostgator: Conclusion

Both Bluehost and HostGator are great choices for a beginner website: cheap, reliable, and fast. Although customer support may not be stellar, the tools provided with all cloud accounts should make it easy enough to fulfill just about any of your basic website needs.

Hostgator Winter 2017 Promotion:

  1. Want HostGator for 1 month free? Enter the code “onemonthcode″ for a discount. If you choose the Baby Monthly plan it should go down to only $0.01. Note that after 1 month it will renew for full price of about $8/month. So if you don’t want to keep this after the class then please just cancel it within a month.
  2. (OR) Want HostGator for 30% off the lifetime of your account? Enter the code “golongerplease″ instead. (this is a better deal if you plan on keeping the account for longer than a few months).

 

* Disclosure: One Month uses both Blue Host and Hostgator, and benefits from their affiliate sales program.