Learning Hack: The Pomodoro Technique

Pomodoros are a simple learning and productivity technique. We all get burnt out or spend time doing stuff that's not really effective or valuable, right?

Take a kitchen timer (a Pomodoro timer) and set it to 25 minutes.

Work on one thing for those 25 minutes. If you're able to do that, when the 25 minutes are up make a little X on a piece of paper, like a post-it, and take a 5 minute break where you're NOT thinking about work. Go walk around, or drink a cup of water, or use the bathroom, or stretch a little bit.

Then decide what you're going to work on next and do another Pomodoro.

After about four Pomodoros cycles (with 5 minute breaks in between each), you should take a longer break of 20 minutes or so.

The goal will be to hit a certain number of Pomodoros in a day, like 8 or so, and then hit that number again or more the next day.

If you get really distracted during a Pomodoro (like you end up spending a few minutes on Facebook) then the Pomodoro doesn't count and you have to start over.

The pomodoro technique accomplishes a few things:

  1. It gives you an accepted relaxation / bucket time. Then you don't feel bad taking a break. In fact, studies show that breaks are important for optimal learning and focus. If you don't take breaks, you might not be as productive as you could be.
  2. It lets you recalibrate what you're working on every 25 minutes. I know that for me I often get unproductive when I'm working on the same thing for a long-time because I start focusing on stuff that isn't important but tricking myself into thinking its super important. (Have you ever found yourself spending more than 15 minutes agonizing over the formatting of a powerpoint slide?) The more often you step back and check in with the self, the more you'll feel like you actually worked on the tasks that you were supposed to.
  3. It provides a small, but reasonable challenge for you to maintain focus. You can defer distractions to a time that is at most 25 minutes away.
  4. It sets a personal challenge for yourself. By quantifying how many Pomodoros you've accomplished during the day, you'll naturally feel a desire to at least match that never the next day.
  5. You feel better at the end of the day. Most of us spend way too much time hunched at our desk and then we feel like shit at the end of the day. It's usually because we haven't been physically active, we didn't drink enough water, or stretch enough throughout the day. These 5 minute breaks are perfect for that. I find that at the end of a day when I practice pomodoros, I usually feel awesome.

So how can you get started?

Well it's as simple as getting a timer, a piece of paper, and a pen, really. But there are a few things I'd recommend:

  • There's an app for that. Pomodoro Timer for the iPhone is a good one. There are a lot of fancy apps out there that track all your Pomodoros and are adjustable and whatnot, but this app does all I really want. It vibrates when your 25 minutes are up, and lets you pick whether you want to take a short or a long break when that's done. 
    (My friend Jon notes that there's a cool desktop alternative called E.gg Timer, which has a pomodoro option at this url: http://e.ggtimer.com/pomodoro)
  • Get a notebook, a day calendar, or even just a post-it at your desk to track your Pomodoros. This will actually be a good reminder at the start of your day that you should be doing Pomodoros in the first place.
  • While you're at it, buy a nice pen.

Hope you enjoyed this post. Do you have a learning technique you'd like to share? Or do you think Pomodoro is a stupid idea? Post about it in the comments below.

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Mattan Griffel

Mattan Griffel

Mattan Griffel is the CEO & co-founder of One Month. Teacher at General Assembly. Studied Philosophy and Finance at NYU. Named to Forbes 30 Under 30 in Education. Featured in BusinessWeek, MIT Technology Review, Huffington Post, Mashable and The Next Web.

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